What legitimizes contemplative inquiry in the liberal arts and sciences? Is propagation by technological means at odds with the humanizing purposes of close-knit teaching and learning communities? Do the peculiar benefits cultivated by contemplative communities in the liberal arts and sciences continue to serve alumni in their respective professions and leisure? A panel composed of undergraduate alumni employed by their alma mater, former students at various stages of career and family, and a teacher of contemplative inquiry share their answers. Students share the how and why of a cooperative contemplative curriculum, which doesn’t take place in the abstract but through a vibrant social network consisting of technologies like Google+, public “pages,” course-specific and private “communities,” YouTube, Blogger, Hangouts, and Google Drive, among others. Respecting disciplinary boundaries, institutional needs, and contingencies of trust, students from various disciplines and professions offer an example of a continuous contemplative inquiry through the gates of the ivory tower.

Morgan Harris

Washington and Lee University

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Sarah Helms

Washington and Lee University

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Grace McGee

Washington and Lee University

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