Since 1987, Mind & Life Dialogues have brought together leading scientists and scholars in conversation with the Dalai Lama to address critical issues of modern life at the intersection of science and contemplative wisdom. To expand the reach of these convenings, in 2019 we launched a new online format. Mind & Life Digital Dialogues summarize presentations and discussion from these events and include photos, illustrations, and video excerpts. These multimedia resources are just one way Mind & Life is leveraging the power of today’s digital communications to share vital insights—and inspire action.



Education of the Heart summarizes presentations and discussion from the 33rd Mind & Life Dialogue with the Dalai Lama, “Reimagining Human Flourishing,” held in Dharamsala, India in March 2018. The multimedia site offers insights from leading scientists, scholars, and educational practitioners, who gathered over five days to explore new frontiers in education rooted in science and contemplative wisdom. Education of the Heart presents material in nine thematic chapters, and includes video excerpts, along with a resource library with links to relevant organizations, curricula, and tools. Visit the site to learn about programs and approaches for educating the ‘whole child,’ including the cultivation of attention, social-emotional skills, systems thinking skills, and ethical virtues like kindness and compassion.



Captured in the Ubuntu Digital Dialogue are presentations and discussions from the 32nd Mind & Life Dialogue, “Botho/Ubuntu: A Dialogue on Spirituality, Science, and Humanity,” held in Gaborone, Botswana in August 2017. The event convened leading African humanitarian and spiritual leaders, scholars, and healers in a conversation with international scientists about the African worldview of ubuntu, known as botho in Botswana. Over three days, participants explored the philosophy of ubuntu—with its emphasis on our shared humanity—and its relevance within an increasingly divided world. While the Dalai Lama was unable to attend, the gathering continued its goal of exploring how the ethic of ubuntu could inform efforts to heal the legacy of wars and colonialism, and advance social justice and women’s equality.